Art Deco

Art Deco design is famously known for it's bold, geometric, and lavish characteristics. The Art Deco style originated from France after World War I and was influenced by the rapid industrial movement sweeping across the world. The name 'Art Deco' comes from the 1925 Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes where the sleek machine-age look came about. As a departure from Art Nouveau, Art Deco elements are sleeker and more stylized. Both art movements emerged as a reaction to major world events; The Industrial Revolution and World War I. Art Deco style tapered off with the start of World War II, as people viewed lavish and over the top designs as inappropriate for war time.

Art Deco had a great influence on interior design. Incorporating streamlined geometric forms and metallic color, Deco interiors tend to be bold with ornate elements. Art Deco furniture pieces include components such as curved features, mirrors, clean lines, chrome hardware, and glass. Designers included geometric fabrics and elements that highlighted chevron patterns, sunburst shapes, and zigzags. One of the most important themes for Art Deco is the exotic. Bringing in different patterns from different cultures represented wealth; for example, lacquered walls were a specialty Asian technique, and African inspired patterned pillows brought in wild and unique touches to a room.

Some of the finest examples of Art Deco art and architecture are found in Havana, Cuba. The Bacardi building is noted for its particular Art Deco style, designed by architects Rafael Fernandez Ruenes, Estaban Rodriguez Castell, and Jose Menendez. This building, built in 1930, has small ornamental gold-leaf zigzag patterns and bronze bats, the Bacardi logo, throughout the space. Other cities that have great examples of Art Deco architecture include Rio de Janeiro, Miami, and New York City.

Inside a Havana Residence

Inside a Havana Residence

Detail of The Bacardi Building

Detail of The Bacardi Building

Inside a 1927 Mansion

Inside a 1927 Mansion

Inside a Miami residence

Inside a Miami residence

Incorporating Art Deco into your own design scheme can add a visually interesting element. Start off with bold geometric patterns, either in your tiled floor or in a bold silk carpet. Along with strong patterns, incorporating glossy and metallic furnishings brings a luxurious feel into your home. Art Deco also has a minimalist nature, so keep balance with some solid colors and streamlined lighting and furniture in your design.  

Check out some of Joseph Carini Carpet's favorite Art Deco designs below:

Deco

Deco

Theo

Theo

 
Deco Oval 

Deco Oval 

Kyle

Kyle

Clancy

Clancy

Joseph Carini

Joseph Carini Carpets , 335 Greenwich St, New York, NY, 10013, United States

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